? Editorial - Alice Hertzog - Imponderabilia

Editorial

Imponderabilia; ‘a series of phenomena of great importance which cannot possibly be recorded by questioning or computing documents, but have to be observed in their full actuality’ - Malinowski, B. [1922] (2002:18) 'Argonauts of the Western Pacific'. Routledge: London

During the anthropologist Sue Benson's time as an undergraduate, a rather dashing group of men came up with an extraordinary plan to pursue her. To charm the young lady, off to London they went, to buy a camel from the Harrods pet shop. Upon returning to Cambridge, the two-humped creature was offered up to the budding anthropologist in an ambitious attempt to woo her. Sue Benson spent many a sunny afternoon, promenading up and down Kings Parade on a camel.

From the everyday to extraordinary curiosities, such as being wooed with a camel in an English market town, Imponderabilia aims to enable authors to relate their interesting and incongruous experiences beyond the academic environment. When students first set to work on this journal last year, they wanted to create a space for dialogue, a place where undergraduates and graduates could exchange ideas and voice their "love of and frustration with anthropology." We have been flooded with requests for the journal and have dispatched every last copy all over the world. Prospective anthropology students have been in touch, a media company has tried to snap up one of our authors, and we have even been solicited to bless an unlucky house in South London!

Drawing on the energy and enthusiasm of the first issue we hope that issue two will do it justice. True to our name, we have gathered imponderabilia, from whisky in Scotland to hutongs in Beijing. Our four sections explore science and evolution, sensory anthropology, urban spaces and environment, as well as showcase student ethnography. We would love it if you could contribute to the discussion too: email the authors and let them know what you think, comment on our website, or even better, join the editorial team for issue three.

Drawing on the energy and enthusiasm of the first issue we hope that issue two will do it justice. True to our name, we have gathered imponderabilia, from whisky in Scotland to hutongs in Beijing. Our four sections explore science and evolution, sensory anthropology, urban spaces and environment, as well as showcase student ethnography. We would love it if you could contribute to the discussion too: email the authors and let them know what you think, comment on our website, or even better, join the editorial team for issue three.

Alice Hertzog
Imponderabilia